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Perfect Rib Eye Roast

December 22, 2011

By Kath Dedon

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People are often nervous about roasting an expensive Rib Eye Roast. Although I’ve roasted many beef roasts, I admit that I always research different ways to do it every time. Even though it’s actually very easy.

This time I settled on the method from “CAREBEARCOOKING” on food.com. My 5.6 pound Choice Rib Eye Roast was approximately the same size as the one in the recipe (5 pounds). The only change I made was to cut the kosher salt in half. The original recipe called for ½ cup of kosher salt; I used ¼ cup and it was plenty.

If you don’t have a meat thermometer, just follow the timing for this recipe and your roast should turn out fine. This recipe for Perfect Rib Eye Roast is very simple, but it makes a fabulous special meal for family and friends.

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Perfect Rib Eye Roast  

(Adapted from a recipe from CAREBEARCOOKING on food.com)

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A Rib Eye Roast is the same cut as a “Prime Rib Roast”; it is simply a Choice grade of meat instead of a Prime grade. It’s much less expensive than Prime beef, and it is what you’ll find at most markets.

The original recipe called for kosher salt which is what I use. For best results I recommend kosher salt.  If you use table salt (Morton’s Iodized Salt, for example) cut the amount of salt at least in half. 

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(print the recipe)

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For a bone-in roast, allow 1 – 1 ½ pounds per person. My 5.6 pound roast served 6, with just the meaty bones leftover.

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1 5-6 pound rib eye roast (choice cut “prime” rib roast)

¼ cup kosher salt (or 2 tablespoons table salt)

1 tablespoon garlic powder or 6 garlic cloves, crushed

Pepper, generous amount

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1. Allow the roast to come to room temperature (allow 2 – 3 hours).

2. Preheat the oven to 500˚.

3. Combine the salt and the garlic.

 Salt and crushed garlic cloves

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Salt and garlic stirred together

4. Place the meat, bone side down, in a shallow roasting pan. (I found that my 12-inch cast iron skillet was a perfect fit.)

5. Add about 1/4 cup water to the pan.

 

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6. Rub the roast all over with the salt and garlic. Generously grind pepper over it.

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7. Roast the meat for 15 minutes.

8. Do not open the oven, but after 15 minutes turn the oven temperature down to 350˚  325˚.

9. Continue to roast at  350˚  325˚ for about 20 minutes per pound. (1 hour and 52 minutes for my 5.6 pound roast). This timing should produce a roast that’s Medium-Rare to Medium.

Update 12/24/12: If you like your roast a bit more on the rare side, try roasting it for about 18 minutes per pound.

Update 12/27/2013: If you have a meat thermometer, start checking the roast 15 minutes at least 30 minutes before you think it will be done. Continue roasting until it is done to your liking. If the roast has reached 95˚, the temperature will go up 8 – 10 degrees for each additional 10 minutes in the oven. (Tip from Molly Stevens in All About Roasting)

Rare: 140-150˚  125 – 130˚

Medium: 150-160˚  135 – 140˚

Well: 170-180˚ (please don’t do this)

10. Allow the roast to sit for 20 – 30 minutes before slicing.

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147 Comments leave one →
  1. December 22, 2011 10:11 am

    Yep, I’m one of those scared to death of ruining an expensive piece of meat! My fail-safe option for our Christmas dinner (last weekend) took a lot of work and time, but it was worth it. I brined a pork loin, butterflied it, pounded it, stuffed it, rolled it and roasted it. Perfect! Maybe I’ll be brave enough (and rich enough!) to try a rib eye next year.

    • December 22, 2011 12:13 pm

      Wow! Your stuffed pork loin sounds delicious! I’m going to have to give that a try.

      • Angie permalink
        December 24, 2013 3:35 pm

        I just saw this recipe and will try it. I am going to add the dijon mustard and worcestershire. I also put fresh garlic and garlic salt. Is it ok to prepare 1 day before cooking it? I am hoping this turns out good! Having it tomorrow on xmas day.

        • December 25, 2013 5:11 am

          It should be just fine to add your seasonings to the roast the day before, Angie.

        • RENEE THOMAS permalink
          December 25, 2013 3:10 pm

          Merry Xmas!!!
          hope all went well with your roast

  2. December 22, 2011 4:12 pm

    So simple yet so intimidating! I wonder why…I’m going to be brave and try this. It sounds like it was perfect. Thank you for sharing…we’re getting ready to go to Colorado, and I’m glad I got a chance to stop by before we depart. Happy holidays and many blessings!

    • December 22, 2011 5:02 pm

      Thanks, Monet! Have a great trip home to Colorado and Merry Christmas!

  3. December 23, 2011 11:51 am

    Um…YUM!!! This sounds so good! And what a great Christmas treat!!

  4. etabaka permalink
    December 25, 2011 6:21 pm

    My father and I saw ribeye roasts on sale the other day at the super-market thinking it would be good for Christmas dinner. Boy were we right!!! We actually dropped ball a bit and forgot to look up a recipe. We realized this this morning. So I looked for a simple recipe of things we had in the house. I can tell you as a matter of fact that I’m glad we forgot to look up a recipe, because If we did I think we would have over thought it and missed out on this gem. This simple recipe yielded one of the bests roasts I’ve had. The amount of salt, garlic, and pepper was perfect, it produced a great crust on the outside and gave wonderful flavor, but still allowed to flavor of the meat to shine through and be the real star.

    A++++++++

  5. Alicia permalink
    December 25, 2011 8:29 pm

    It was way too salty for us and it over cooked also. Oh well, there is always next yr.

    • January 12, 2012 11:34 am

      I’m sorry to hear it didn’t work out for you, Alicia.

    • December 19, 2012 6:34 pm

      Why do you think it was overcooked? Is your oven temp correct?Did you use a thermometer? Doesn’t sound like it was the recipe.

  6. Dan Davis permalink
    December 27, 2011 8:47 am

    I too did not have all the ingredients in several of the reciepes I looked up online. I ended up putting 1/3 of a cup of water in a pan and rubbing the roast with the contents of a packet of Lipton onion soup. 500 degrees for 15 minutes, dropped to 325 for 1.5 hours, Started checking temp with meat thermometer until it reached 120. let sit for 20 minutes and had a close to perfect med rare roast.

    • January 12, 2012 11:35 am

      Sounds good!

    • Bill Brown permalink
      December 25, 2013 4:19 am

      Thanks for posting your method Dan. I don’t have all the ingredients either. But I do have the onion soup mix. It’s Christmas morning and I have a 5 lb ribeye roast just waiting to be flavored and roasted. I’m going with your method. Also Thanks Kathy for your recipe. I’ll try not to wait for Christmas day next time to inventory my ingredients. Happy Holidays!!

      • walter maude permalink
        December 25, 2013 5:23 am

        Seriously I would not add the Kosher salt if you are using the onion soup mix…good luck and Merry Christmas!

  7. Patti permalink
    December 27, 2011 6:16 pm

    Thank you so much for publishing this recipe. Christmas dinner was really great and especially meant alot since we made the 15 hour drive to spend with our family. Thank you!

    • January 12, 2012 11:36 am

      Glad you liked it, Patti, and that you got to spend Christmas with your family! :)

  8. Denise Shehab permalink
    January 21, 2012 10:31 am

    I marinate a day before, with garlic, seasalt,ground pepper, dijon mustard spread all around the roast & worcestershire sauce. It comes out so good, you don’t need to make gravy….
    My grandmother & mother’s recipee….

  9. Chrissy permalink
    March 27, 2012 2:16 pm

    I’m really glad I found this recipe, it sounds simple and I love garlic! This will be my first rib eye roast (making it tonight) and prime rib being my favorite beef, I admit I’ve been a little intimidated to try it until now. My cousin makes one every year for Christmas and while it’s good, I think mine will turn out better with this recipe ;)

  10. Susanne permalink
    April 7, 2012 10:46 am

    This sounds delicious! But can I use a deboned piece of Rib eye for it, or does it need the bones to be still attached?

    • April 7, 2012 11:06 am

      Hi Susanne! A boneless Rib Eye roast should work fine. You should probably put the roast on a meat rack, since you’re not using the roast’s bones as a “rack”. If you don’t have a rack, though, it’s probably not essential.

  11. Lisa Wilson permalink
    May 23, 2012 4:40 pm

    That was delicious! Thank you for such a simple recipe!

  12. December 10, 2012 11:57 pm

    I tried your recipe last week and it worked fabulously – husband raved about it all night so a big thank you!

    • December 11, 2012 6:18 am

      Thanks so much for letting me know that you and your husband liked it! :)

  13. Steve permalink
    December 17, 2012 8:42 pm

    We just made your roast! So awesome!!! Better than Lawry!

  14. Laura A. permalink
    December 21, 2012 3:04 pm

    This recipe is so easy and WONDERFUL!!! Ive used Paula Dean’s recipe before which is almost the same but calls for you to leave the rib roast on at 500 alittle longer and then turn the oven off and don’t open it for about 4hrs for the roast I had. This recipe had my rib roast cooked to perfection in half that time and was just as GREAT without the wait! I love it!!

    • December 21, 2012 3:07 pm

      Thanks so much for your comment, Laura! I just made it again a few days ago and it was just as good as the first time!

  15. December 22, 2012 7:58 pm

    I have 2 2.8# roast. I now have 9 people coming. Can I get another 2 or 3# roast and cook it all together as 3 separate roasts? and is it still 20 min per pound? Thank you

    • December 23, 2012 5:49 am

      To be honest, Wendy, I think this recipe works best with a roast that’s at least 4.5 – 5 pounds. I did some quick research and found J. Kenji Lopez-Alt’s “low and slow” method. Reading through all of the comments, one person (“Kitchenista”) said she successfully roasted a 3-lb roast with his method. She said it was “medium-medium rare” after 2 hours and 10 minutes. That sounds more well-done than I like, so I’d be checking at 1 hour and 30 minutes or so. She did the 500 degree blast after the rest for just 6 minutes.

      If I had three 2.8 – 3 pound roasts, I would try Kenji’s method, cooking them for a shorter period of time. Good luck!

  16. MsChicksinger.com permalink
    December 23, 2012 2:01 pm

    so excited! we are having our holiday dinner today and I just put it in the oven! I took lots of pics so I’ll let you know how it all turns out! ;-) great, easy and straightforward recipe…

    • December 23, 2012 3:02 pm

      I’m looking forward to hearing how it worked for you. Hope you like it as much as we have enjoyed it! It is very easy!

      • MsChicksinger.com permalink
        December 24, 2012 12:07 pm

        it turned out great! I might just cook it a little less, as we prefer rare to medium rare, but boy was it a hit! I also, made bearnaise to go with it and that was the perfect accompaniment! ;-) I look forward to more recipes from you!

        • December 24, 2012 1:56 pm

          I’m so glad it worked for you! Mmmm…bearnaise sounds terrific with it!

  17. Sharen permalink
    December 23, 2012 7:35 pm

    What adjustments would I make for an 11# beauty?

    • December 24, 2012 7:20 am

      I would use the same method, Sharen. After the initial 15-minute roast at 500 degrees, I’d turn the temperature down to 325 degrees and roast it for about 18 16 minutes per pound. I’d start checking it with a meat thermometer after about 2 hours at the lower temperature.

  18. December 23, 2012 10:23 pm

    I make this every Christmas following the same steps except I like to add some sprigs of fresh thyme & rosemary to the garlic paste. Classic and delicious!

  19. December 24, 2012 11:44 am

    Glad I found this easy recipe…I have about a 7lb roast. Hopefully, it will be enough for 8 people. I’m going to cook it tomorrow and let you know how it turns out. Thanks and Merry Christmas!

    • December 25, 2012 5:47 am

      I think your 7 pound roast should be enough for 8 people, Cathy, especially with all of the holiday side dishes. Merry Christmas to you!

  20. Angie permalink
    December 24, 2012 4:58 pm

    I see you changed the temperature for final temperatures of rare, medium and well-done. So is the new temp the one we want just before taking the roast out of the oven? And it will heat up another 10 degrees while resting on the counter? I just want to make sure I’m cooking my little 3 lber to the right temp. Thanks!

    • December 25, 2012 5:45 am

      Yes, I did change it, Angie. The new temperatures, from my research, seem to be more accurate. They are the temperatures for when to take the roast out of the oven. The temperature will go up during the resting time.

      • Angie permalink
        December 25, 2012 7:45 am

        Perfect. Thank you! It was funny because just before returning to your site yesterday I was telling my husband that I had checked 3 different sources the day before and that I wasn’t sure about the temperature, and then I opened your site and you had changed yours! I can’t wait to eat our roast!

  21. PatT permalink
    December 25, 2012 10:41 am

    I made this last night and it was wonderful! Thank you so much for posting this recipe. My Christmas Eve roast came out wonderfully. My guests went for seconds and sometimes thirds! Wow! That is a compliment in itself!!

    • December 25, 2012 1:35 pm

      So glad to hear that, Pat! Merry Christmas!

      • Carol Platt permalink
        December 18, 2013 4:50 am

        Kath Dedon wow! That is my last name are we related? Is your husband a cousin of mine?

  22. Bill Guernsey permalink
    December 25, 2012 12:36 pm

    Great recipe! The only thing I would add is use a digital thermometer, I ruined a prime rib once waiting for the old analog therometer to get the core temp correct.

    With a digital one the temperature is accurate and instant, considering a person might spend 70.00 or more dollars for a roast the ten dollar investment in a digital therometer is good insurance for a perfect roast, blessings Bill.

    • December 25, 2012 1:34 pm

      I totally agree, Bill! I say in the blog post, “If you have a thermometer…”, but I really feel that an accurate digital thermometer is essential.

  23. December 25, 2012 1:29 pm

    We are making this today…so far, so good. Do you trim your roast, and if so, how are you doing it?

    • December 25, 2012 1:40 pm

      John, do you mean do I trim the fat? The store where I buy my roasts trims them well, so I don’t feel I need to trim it at all.The butchers there also remove the chine bone and then retie it back on the roast. It makes carving easier.

  24. Bethanne permalink
    December 25, 2012 2:25 pm

    Mine is cooking right now. I’m using an armatele roasting dish. WOW! The smell is amazing! Loved to know temps for rare, med rare, etc. got my thermometer all ready to go and will check for 130 then rest out of oven… Double baked potatoes going in while resting. Green beans done. Traditional chocolate ice box cake for desert. This is our traditional Christmas meal.

  25. December 25, 2012 2:29 pm

    I’m kinda worried because I forgot to put the water in the pan. It’s in the 500 degree oven now and I don’t want to open the door.

    • December 25, 2012 2:32 pm

      I think it will be fine, Julia. A lot of recipes don’t add the water.

  26. Angie permalink
    December 25, 2012 2:52 pm

    The sticker on my ribeye roast says that it has been blade tenderized and should be cooked to 160 degrees. Is there really a risk if I don’t cooked it that high?

    • Kath permalink*
      December 26, 2012 8:22 am

      Wow, Angie! I have never seen that label on meat. I had to “google” it to find out what it means. It turns out that a lot of beef in the US (and Canada?) is mechanically blade tenderized. The meat is poked with needles to tenderize it. The problem? If there are pathogens on the surface of the meat, that would be killed when cooked, they can be pushed into the center of the beef where they would not be killed if the interior temperature doesn’t reach 160 degree.

      At this time labels are not required, so I have probably unwittingly eaten blade tenderized beef. :/

  27. Joe permalink
    December 25, 2012 3:29 pm

    Just finished Christmas dinner. Roast was incredible. Thanks for the help.

  28. Charlene Uresy permalink
    December 25, 2012 3:56 pm

    After having served rib eye roast for at least 4 years during the Christmas holiday, I am shouting to the world: your recipe was right on! My roast looked beautiful, and tasted great! Thank you

  29. Myra R permalink
    December 25, 2012 5:47 pm

    I made the Rib Eye Roast this evening for Christmas dinner. It tastes fantastic! Thank you for this easy-to-follow, yet delicious recipe!

  30. Mike permalink
    December 25, 2012 6:18 pm

    Great simple recipe, perfect Christmas dinner. Wonderful salty crust, meat was cooked perfectly thanks for the additional tips on the time. Make sure to have a meat thermometer handy and check it kind of early. Let the meat come to room temperature and let it sit after removing it from oven you will have a delicious feast.

  31. Flor permalink
    December 25, 2012 7:03 pm

    I cooked this roast for Christmas dinner and it came out perfect. I put less than a 1/4 of a cup of kosher salt added the garlic and pepper. It was perfect!! Thank you!

  32. Judy Steiner permalink
    December 26, 2012 6:37 pm

    This was a great recipe — except too salty … but that could be because I used sea salt instead of kosher salt. Next year I will use Kosher salt and use less than 1/4 cup. BUT, the saltiness aside … the roast was done to perfection! If you can, invest in a thermometer that lets you know what the temperature is without having to open the oven. Best investment I ever made three years ago.

    • December 27, 2012 6:25 am

      The original recipe called for 1/2 cup of salt; imagine how salty that would have been! Because Kosher salt has a coarser grain than table salt or most sea salts, it is lower in sodium by volume. You would probably want to use 2 tablespoons of a fine-grained sea salt.

  33. Laura permalink
    December 27, 2012 3:49 am

    I have made rib eye roast twice before this year; neither recipe was good, a financial and culinary disappointment. But I thought I would give eye roast one more try and found your recipe. Perfection! I followed the recipe exactly (reducing the ingredient proportionally for my 3.8 lb. roast) and wanting it rare took it out at just 125 degrees. It was Beautiful — pink/red, flavorful, melt-in-your mouth. Thank you. I have found my eye roast recipe at last!

    • December 27, 2012 6:26 am

      I love hearing that the recipe worked for you, Laura! Thanks for letting me know!

  34. Mary Anne permalink
    December 27, 2012 11:52 am

    Thanks for this recipe! Looks simple yet very delicious! Question for you…. It looks like you tied the roast. If you didn’t have kitchen twine- is it ok to leave the roast untied? I am only roasting a 3.5 lbs roast….

    • December 27, 2012 12:16 pm

      It’s fine to leave it untied. Mine came tied from the grocery store. They cut the chine bone off and then tie it back on. It makes it easier to slice when it’s done, but it’s not necessary to do that.

      • Mary Anne permalink
        December 27, 2012 4:12 pm

        Thank you so much for your quick reply! It’s much appreciated!

  35. armymum permalink
    December 31, 2012 1:53 pm

    Trying this for dinner tonight…added some parmesan and homemade bread crumbs to the crust mix….Happy New Year!

  36. Leigh permalink
    January 1, 2013 2:01 pm

    This was amazing. Thanks for sharing. Wish I could share the picture with you.

  37. Cruzin permalink
    January 2, 2013 11:42 am

    I am SO excited to use this recipe. Thank you! I have a 4.25 lb. deboned ribeye roast, so I am using a meat rack. After reading all of these comments, I cannot wait to chime back in after its done!

    • Cruzin permalink
      January 2, 2013 4:54 pm

      Chiming in, all done! It is divine, thank you for sharing. It was perfectly seasoned and cooked just right to medium-rare/medium, following your instructions.

      • January 2, 2013 5:03 pm

        I’m so glad to hear it, Cruzin! Thanks for letting me know! :)

  38. Jane permalink
    January 5, 2013 2:44 pm

    I am making this tonight first time one question my kids have is will they have gravy for their potatoes haha so can I make one with the drippings?

    • January 5, 2013 2:55 pm

      Hi Jane,
      I’ve never had very many drippings with this roast. I guess that means the roast retains all the juiciness? So I don’t think you really can make a gravy.

  39. Jane permalink
    January 6, 2013 6:19 pm

    Didn’t get to make it last night as my boys really wanted pizza lol! But made this tonight and it turned out great thanks so much for the recipe. I wish I was better at and liked to cook more that I am/do. My family love it :)

    • January 8, 2013 9:37 am

      Thanks so much for your comment, Jane! I’m glad to know your family liked the roast! :)

  40. John permalink
    February 1, 2013 8:11 am

    I’m just wondering if this recipie would work with a 5 to 8 pound boneless New York Strip?

    • February 1, 2013 9:41 am

      I think it should work fine, John, but it may take less time because a New York strip roast is not usually as thick as a rib roast. After the initial high heat roast and you have turned the oven temperature down, I’d check the temperature after about 40 or 45 more minutes.

  41. Lisa Barnum permalink
    March 31, 2013 2:31 pm

    well mine is in the oven as I type. I have made many prime Rib Roast for many different holidays. But I’m never happy with the results. So I was happy to find this recipe this search. At this time I’m excited that maybe just maybe have found the answer. I have reseached many recipes and tried many of them to my family holidays means prime rib for dinner. when preping for the roast I used onion and garlic powder and salt then cracked black pepper.

  42. May 7, 2013 5:50 pm

    It was SO yummy! Added rosemary and took it out at 120 degrees. Thank you so much!

    • May 7, 2013 5:56 pm

      Thanks so much for your comment, Jackie! I’m so glad you liked it. Adding rosemary is an excellent idea; I’ll have to try that. ;)

  43. September 12, 2013 4:39 pm

    I just did it, bought a 3.95 pound piece of ultra expensive Prime Rib Eye, with two bones… salt and pepper, brought the oven to 500 and place it inside bone side down for 13 minutes, then 18 minutes per pound… boy o boy is HEB expensive… 68 dollars for 4 pounds of beef…

    • September 12, 2013 4:50 pm

      Wow, Turner! That is expensive, but “prime” grade beef is a lot more expensive than the “choice” grade that I use. (Prime grade is also even more delicious, though! ;))
      Hope you enjoyed it!

  44. Cathy permalink
    September 24, 2013 10:53 am

    My family praised this roast as the best they ever tasted. They said it was the best meal I ever prepared. So simple and delicious! Thank you!

    • September 24, 2013 11:13 am

      It makes me so happy to hear how much your family enjoyed the roast, Cathy! Thanks for letting me know. :)

  45. Walter Maude permalink
    November 12, 2013 1:39 pm

    Would suggest using a lot less salt after following this recipe…way too salty, even for someone who really likes salt! Cooked it in a well seasoned cast iron frying pan…it looked perfect. Next time I will use 1 tablespoon of salt at the most….

    • November 13, 2013 9:39 am

      I’m wondering if you used table salt instead of kosher salt.

      1 teaspoon of Kosher salt has 1120mg of sodium.
      1 teaspoon of Morton table salt has 2360mg of sodium.

      I would use half as much table salt.

      Thanks for your comment, Walter. I’ll make a note in the recipe.

      • Walter Maude permalink
        December 21, 2013 5:09 am

        I did use Kosher salt. In retrospect, I think the issue had to do more with the size my roast (3.0) rather than the amount your recipe call for. I should have used a scant 1/8 cup. My error and I apoligise for my original post. I am planning to try again for our New Years dinner. The texture was perfect and the arouma was devine.

        • December 21, 2013 5:21 am

          That makes sense, Walter! Happy New Year!

  46. November 19, 2013 6:52 pm

    Made it tonight for the first time. 3.7 pound rib eye roast. Scaled down the ingredients. Pulled the roast out at 120 degrees. It was wonderful. Served it with some garlic mashed potatoes and oven roasted asparagus. Thanks so much!

    • November 21, 2013 8:52 am

      I’m so glad you liked it, James! Thanks for your comment. :)

  47. Dawn permalink
    November 22, 2013 12:16 am

    I asked the butcher for the wrong cut. I was going to make an Eye of Round – but that isn’t what came out of my mouth! Now my cooking is sort of hit or miss, so I scoured the web for a good Rib Eye recipe and found yours!
    It was a 4.5 lb roast and I left it out 2 hours but I get worried about bacteria so popped it in at 500 degrees even though it was still cool to the touch.
    Followed your directions to a ‘”T” except…even after cutting the kosher salt down to about half, with the appropriate amount of garlic, the rub seemed a little much so I didn’t use it all.
    It only took about 5 minutes longer than estimated to be what my husband called a perfect “medium” but you can be sure we had a thermometer handy!
    You saved my life.
    Next time I’ll bump the garlic back up. It was powder, might try a little of both fresh and powder. And I thought it was kosher salt that came with my salt n pepper mills, but will purchase genuine kosher for next time. Is all that salt also to help seal the outside of the roast?

    • November 24, 2013 4:50 pm

      I’m glad it worked for you, Dawn! I don’t know the science behind the salt, but I do know that most chefs like to generously salt roasts, and steaks, too, for that matter. It does give beef a well-seasoned crust.

  48. John Fitzpatrick permalink
    November 23, 2013 8:23 pm

    Today I bought my first ribeye roast. A six pound bone in roast that I was looking forward to trying my own technique on. I looked up on the web like this site and found that others were saying to just add salt and peper. Well let me tell you, I’m glad I didn’t listen. I went and created an amazing rub that made the best ribeye I ever had. Follow my recipe and you won’t be disappointed.
    Paprika

  49. John Fitzpatrick permalink
    November 23, 2013 8:57 pm

    Fitz’s Ribeye Roast Rub,
    1/4 cup paprika, 1/4 cup italian seasoning, 1/8 cup onion powder, 1/8 cup garlic powder, 1/8 cup lawrys peper season salt, 1/8 cup salt, 1/8 cup kansas city steak seasoning, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 2 cap fulls soy sauce, 1/8 cup worcestershire.
    Remove roast from frig. Put it on a raised rack in the pan and put the bone side down. Put all of the rub on the top and the sides. Cover and let sit for 2 hours. Pre heat oven to 500. Put 6 cups of water in the pan below the rack. Put in the oven for 20 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 300 and cook for 1 1/2 hours. Remove from oven and cover with aluminum foil for 30 minutes. Last but not least, enjoy!!!

  50. John Fitzpatrick permalink
    November 23, 2013 11:04 pm

    One thing I forgot to say. I put butter all over the roast before putting on the rub.

    • November 24, 2013 4:56 pm

      Thanks for your comments, John. I love it when people put their own spin on recipes to make them just the way they like them! :) I bet your roast was really flavorful!

      • Carol Platt permalink
        December 18, 2013 6:06 am

        Does he have any relatives in Ohio?

  51. December 18, 2013 7:33 am

    @Carol Platt – Bob doesn’t have any relatives in Ohio that we know of. His dad and grandparents were from Minnesota.

  52. John Nabor permalink
    December 22, 2013 9:20 am

    Like many, I am nervous about cooking this 6.25# roast because it’s so expensive. I figured what the heck, I might as well run with it and there seems to be much success in the past. I am sure it will be fine, wish me luck. Any thoughts or changes since I will be using a convection oven?

    • December 22, 2013 9:44 am

      Oh, John, I have absolutely no experience with a convection oven. Maybe someone who has will read this and chime in with some advice.

      • December 22, 2013 9:51 am

        A quick Internet search took me to this site ( http://www.convection-calculator.com/ ) that has a conversion calculator. I might try starting the roast at 500 degrees for 15 minutes and then use the calculator to convert it for the convection oven for the rest of the roasting time.

        • John Nabor permalink
          December 22, 2013 10:57 am

          Awesome thanks

        • John Nabor permalink
          December 22, 2013 11:14 am

          The conversion was 480 degrees for 11 min and 1 hour 33 minutes at 305 degrees vs. the 500 degrees for 15 min and 2 hours and 5 min. So as you can see there is quite a difference, glad I asked :) and thanks for the tip!!!!

        • December 22, 2013 11:34 am

          I’d love to hear how it turns out!

  53. December 25, 2013 9:43 am

    Happy Holiday my friend, Just put my rib eye in the oven, my first try at a rib eye roast .

  54. December 25, 2013 10:30 am

    How much sea salt would you use for a 12# boneless ribeye and what do you think for the cooking time.

    • December 25, 2013 3:27 pm

      A boneless ribeye will cook much more quickly than a bone-in one. I’ve never cooked a boneless one. Check it after about 90 minutes.

      If the sea salt is coarse like Kosher salt, I’d use about 1/3 cup. If it’s a fine grind like table salt, I’d try about 3 tablespoons.

  55. Jane K. permalink
    December 25, 2013 3:15 pm

    My roast is getting close to being done and it smells fabulous! Can’t wait to taste it!

  56. December 25, 2013 3:41 pm

    The rib eye turned out great, I cooked it about 30 min to long but other than that it was superb…
    thanks

  57. Tina M. permalink
    December 25, 2013 8:02 pm

    I am also a success story! So afraid of ruining an expensive piece of meat. I followed your instructions and timing and our roast was done to perfection! Thank you SO much!

  58. Faye Vucich permalink
    December 25, 2013 8:39 pm

    I prepared your recipe for the rib eye roast for our Christmas dinner today and it was so good!! It turned out perfectly by following your advice on the perfect temp. for medium! Thanks! Faye

  59. traysee permalink
    December 26, 2013 7:04 am

    I made this yesterday for Christmas dinner, amazing

    • December 27, 2013 9:35 am

      Thanks for your comment; it makes me happy to hear that it has worked so well for others. :)

  60. Ma Bell permalink
    December 27, 2013 3:47 am

    Made this for Christmas dinner. I had a 2.75 roast so I cut the kosher salt in half. Still was a bit too salty on the outside pieces that were in direct contact with the salt. Placed roast on a rack in a shallow pan. Forgot to cook on the bone side, so it was cooked on meat side. Nevertheless, it was delicious! What an easy recipe and simple way to cook a great piece of meat. Don’t get to feast on an expensive piece of meat often, but I will never be afraid of cooking a ribeye roast again. Thank you and Happy Holidays, Kath Dedon!

    • December 27, 2013 9:37 am

      Thank you for your comment! It probably is best to cut down on the salt for a small roast. I’ll have to remember that if I try a small one. Happy Holidays to you!

  61. Ma Bell permalink
    December 27, 2013 3:51 am

    Forgot to ask…there was very little juice and I love the juice over mashed potatoes or rice. Should I just increase the water (though I did add about 1/2 cup of beef broth)?

    • December 27, 2013 9:43 am

      I never really get any juice with this method. I like to think that all of that goodness stays in the roast. But it also means I have not had juice to use over potatoes.

  62. JoLanda O'Reilly permalink
    December 27, 2013 6:23 am

    I have a 19lb roast- should I cut it in half? If not do you think 18 min. per pound is still about right?

    • December 27, 2013 9:52 am

      JoLanda, I have never roasted a rib roast over about 6.5 pounds, but I did some quick research for you.

      I wouldn’t cut the roast in half. Your 19 pound roast should be left whole in all of its glory, in my opinion!

      This site uses a similar method that works out to about 12.5 minutes per pound for a rare 18 pound roast. http://www.primesteakhouses.com/how-to-cook-prime-rib.html

      Molly Stevens points out in her recipe for rib roast (in her book, All About Roasting) that a very large roast should be taken out of the oven sooner than a smaller one. The reason is that a large roast’s temperature will rise more when it’s resting. She suggests the following temps for a large roast:

      Rare: 110 – 115
      Medium Rare: 120
      Medium: 125

      Check the roast at least 30 – 45 minutes before you think it will be done. If it is not at the desired temperature continue to roast. She says once it has reached 95 degrees, the temperature will go up 8 – 10 degrees for every additional 10 minutes of roasting time.

      Then let the roast rest for 30 – 40 minutes.

  63. Tammy Beery permalink
    January 1, 2014 2:17 pm

    Hi There, I bought my first bone-in rib-eye roast for my families New Year meal and in searching for recipes, stumbled on to this blog. Thank you for sharing … the pictures, step by step procedure…all very good, and very helpful for novice cooks. The roast was delicious and perfect! Happy New Year!
    Tammy

    • January 2, 2014 11:18 am

      I’m so glad you and your family enjoyed the roast, Tammy! Thanks for letting me know, and Happy New Year to you, too! :)

  64. January 3, 2014 1:09 pm

    I would like to try this and have a roast without bones in it. Are there any modifications necessary? Thanks. Happy new year. Susan.

    • January 3, 2014 1:46 pm

      Hi Susan,
      It’s best to use a meat rack for a boneless roast. It doesn’t have to be an expensive one. I recently got a small one that cost less than $6.

      Give the roast the initial 15-minutes at 500 degrees, then turn the temperature down to 325. I would try roasting it for an additional 16 minutes per pound. For a 3-pound roast, that would be an additional 48 minutes, but I’d start checking it after 30 minutes.

      Happy New Year to you!

  65. Jackie permalink
    January 4, 2014 11:46 am

    I have an Ewave Convection Oven and would like to cook this roast. Any recommendations would be appreciated.

    JG

    • January 4, 2014 12:24 pm

      I have never used a convection oven, Jackie. On Dec. 22 (2013) John Nabor asked the same question. He came up with this for his 6.25 pound roast:
      “The conversion was 480 degrees for 11 min and 1 hour 33 minutes at 305 degrees vs. the 500 degrees for 15 min and 2 hours and 5 min.”
      He found this site useful for making the conversion: http://www.convection-calculator.com/

      • Jackie permalink
        January 4, 2014 12:35 pm

        Thank you for the inform

  66. phil permalink
    February 16, 2014 7:57 pm

    Followed the cooking side of this to a tee. Meat turned out great. Thanks alot.

    • February 17, 2014 5:10 am

      I’m so glad it worked well for you, Phil. Thanks for your comment!

  67. Lenny permalink
    March 19, 2014 8:50 pm

    Trying out rib eye roast for company spring pot luck tomorrow. No salt/pepper. Marinated roast in worsteshire sauce for 2hours, enclosed in a bag, and seasoned with just Safeway Mediterranean Roast Rub 30 min before I put in oven.

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